Call for Papers
Chinese Journal of Comparative Law (CJCL)

We invite submissions for The Chinese Journal of Comparative Law (CJCL), a brand-new law journal the inaugural issue of which to be officially published by the Oxford University Press in March 2013. The Journal will publish two issues each year and will accommodate substantial articles and shorter works including but not confined to legislative commentaries, case notes and book reviews.

ABOUT THE CJCL: The Chinese Journal of Comparative Law (CJCL) is an independent, peer-reviewed, general comparative law journal published under the auspices of the International Academy of Comparative Law (IACL) and in association with the Silk Road Institute for International and Comparative Law (SRIICL) at Xian Jiaotong University, PR China.

CJCL aims to provide a leading international forum for the interchange of views and research collaboration between Chinese lawyers and lawyers in other parts of the world. It accommodates and fosters top-quality discourses falling within what is broadly conceived as comparative studies on all disciplines of law, including cross-disciplinary legal studies, with a view to serving constructively the Chinese legal system and its continuous evolution and reform. It also aims to contribute, in a vital way, to global legal scholarship by providing to a wide range of legal debates an increasingly important Chinese perspective. CJCL gives preference to articles addressing issues of fundamental and lasting importance in the field of comparative law, particularly those having close relevance to the development of the Chinese legal system.

PAPER SUBMISSION PROCEDURE: All papers, including substantial articles and shorter works, are expected to be submitted through the online submission system of the Journal. Please register and log in at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/cjcl

All submitted papers are expected to comply with the Oxford University Standard for Citation of Legal Authorities (OSCOLA) available at http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/publications/oscola.php. A substantial article should not normally exceed 1,2000 words (including footnotes). Shorter works should not normally exceed 3,000 words (including footnotes). Papers exceeding the maximum length may be rejected at the editor's discretion.

FURTHER INFORMATION: Please direct any questions to Dr Jinyuan Su (nnpercent@gmail.com), Dr Qiao Liu (goodlawliu@gmail.com), or Professor Wenhua Shan (wenhuashan@gmail.com).



Posted 9/5/12